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Ancient Near-East Blog

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Capital of a column from the audience hall of the palace of Darius I, Susa

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 2:20 PM Comments comments (3)

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Capital of a column from the audience hall of the palace of Darius I, Susa, c. 510 B.C.E., Achaemenid, Tell of the Apadana, Susa, Iran (Louvre) Speakers: Dr. Steven Zucker & Dr. Beth Harris. Created by Steven Zucker and Beth Harris.



The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 2:15 PM Comments comments (0)

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The Cyrus Cylinder is one of the most famous objects to have survived from the ancient world. It was inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform on the orders of Persian King Cyrus the Great (559-530 B.C.E.) after he captured Babylon in 539 B.C.E. It was found in Babylon in modern Iraq in 1879 during a British Museum e...
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Persepolis: The Audience Hall of Darius and Xerxes

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 2:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Growth of the Achaemenid Empire under different kings


By the early fifth century B.C.E. the Achaemenid (Persian) Empire ruled an estimated 44% of the human population of planet Earth. Through regional administrators the Persian kings controlled a vast territory which they constantly sought to expand. Famous for monumental architecture, Persian kings establishe...

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Persian art, an introduction

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 1:50 PM Comments comments (0)

The Persian Empire, 490 B.C.E.

 

 


The heart of ancient Persia is in what is now southwest Iran, in the region called the Fars. In the second half of the 6th century B.C.E., the Persians (also called the Achaemenids) created an enormous empire reaching from the Indus Valley to Northern Greece and from Central Asia to Egypt.

 

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Lamassu from the citadel of Sargon II

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 9:20 AM Comments comments (0)

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Lamassu (winged human-headed bulls possibly lamassu or shedu) from the citadel of Sargon II, Dur Sharrukin (now Khorsabad, Iraq), Neo-Assyrian, c. 720-705 B.C.E., gypseous alabaster, 4.20 x 4.36 x 0.97 m, excavated by P.-E. Botta 1843-44 (Musée du Louvre) Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker IN ...

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Assyrian Sculpture

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 8:35 AM Comments comments (0)


Protective Spirit Relief from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II, 883-859 B.C.E., Neo-Assyrian, alabaster, 224 x 127 x 12 cm (extant), Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Iraq © Trustees of the British Museum. One of a pair which guarded an entrance into the private apartments of Ashurnasirpal II. The figure of a man with wings may be the supernatural creat...
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Assyrian art, an introduction

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 8:20 AM Comments comments (0)

Map of the Neo-Assyrian Empire and its expansions.

A Military Culture

 

The Assyrian empire dominated Mesopotamia and all of the Near East for the first half of the first millennium, led by a series of highly ambitious and aggressive warrior kings. Assyrian society was entirely military, with men obliged to fight in the army at any time. State offices...

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List of Rulers of Mesopotamia

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 8:15 AM Comments comments (0)


Southern Mesopotamia

Early Dynastic Period 12


Gilgamesh of Uruk (legendary)

2700 B.C.

Mesanepada of Ur

2450 B.C.

Eannatum of Lagash

2400 B.C.

Enannatum of Lagash

2430 B.C.

Uruinimgina of Lagash

2350 B.C.

Lugalzagesi of Uruk

2350 B.C.


Dynasty of Akkad (Agade)


Sargon

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Mesopotamian Deities

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 8:05 AM Comments comments (0)


Mesopotamian civilization existed for well over 3,000 years, from the formation of the first cities at the end of the fourth millennium B.C. to the early years of the Roman empire. During this period, religion was a major factor influencing behavior, political decision making, and material culture.

 

Unlike some later monotheistic religions, in Mesopotamian mythology there existed n...

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Flood Stories

Posted on May 20, 2016 at 8:05 AM Comments comments (0)

Stories about a great flood are found in the folklore of many cultures. The earliest written sources are inscribed in Sumerian on clay tablets and date to the late third millennium B.C. Mesopotamian versions of the flood story may have had their beginnings in the annual spring flooding of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. Alternatively, some scholars believe that a change i...

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